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A rumour has got abroad to the effect that the Rev R Whincup, vicar of Windhill, who is chaplain to the 1/6 West Yorks Regt, had been sent to the base ill. The truth is that as the result of his arduous duties the rev gentleman was seen to be run down and Dr Anderson advised a few days’ rest. Those who know Mr Whincup intimately, however, do not need telling that he is not the sort to surrender unless absolutely compelled to do so and, as usual, instead of considering his own interests, he heroically continued to minister to and encourage the lads in the trenches with whom he is a great favourite. Although he himself would be the last to make the claim, Mr Whincup is a hero amongst our heroic defenders. He is one of those who prove beyond doubt that there are  heroes in war who neither stand behind a gun nor brandish a sword. 22 September 1916
The Rev R Whincup has had trench fever but his numerous friends will be pleased to hear that after being in hospital about a fortnight, he is now much better and has been able to resume his duties. In a letter to his Windhill parishioners, the rev gentleman says: “The chief difficult in this complaint is the temperature which runs up and down in amazing fashion. “Many people at the front suffer from it and its exact origin seems to rather baffle the skill of even the most brilliant medical officers we have out here. In some cases it can be thrown off in a short time but in others it takes weeks and weeks.” 10 November 1916
When we were on the march on Sept 29th, I did not feel very well and so I was sent into hospital where the doctor told me that I had got what is known out here as trench fever. The chief difficulty in this complaint is the temperature which runs up and down in an amazing fashion. Many people at the Front suffer from it and its exact origins seem to rather baffle the skill of even the many brilliant medical officers we have out here. In some instance it can be thrown off in a short time but in others it takes weeks and weeks. I was in hospital for about a fortnight but I am very glad to say that now I am much better and I have been able to resume my work. The attack perhaps serves me right for boasting in a recent monthly letter about my health at the Front for the past twelve months. Truly pride goeth before a fall! 17 November 1916
During the Battle of the Somme, Rev Whincup was struck down with Trench Fever It was sympathetically reported at home and described by him after he recovered
“The chief difficulty in this complaint is the temperature which runs up and down in an amazing fashion”
Struck down with Trench Fever