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But on 13 August 1915, the newspaper ran two stories about Richard Whincup leaving to take up his role as chaplain. The popular Vicar of Windhill, the Rev R Whincup, left for the front early on Wednesday morning to act as chaplain to the 6th West Yorkshire Regiment (Yorkshire Territorials). Mr Whincup was one of the chaplains to the regiment before the outbreak of war and promptly reported himself when mobilisation took place. He was not only ready to serve but anxious to be with the men, but the chaplaincy arrangements at the time did not permit of his being called up. When the 6th West Yorkshire were ordered to the Front Mr Whincup again expressed a desire to join the regiment. After the men had been out in France some time Mr Whincup received letters saying how welcome his ministrations would  be and once more he got into communication with the authorities.
Last week he was summoned to the War Office and asked to accept the chaplaincy to the regiment. Mr Whincup announced to his congregation  on Sunday that in the course of a few days he expected to be at the Front. Renovation For the last few weeks the church has been closed for renovation and the services have been held in the large room of the school which was crowded on Sunday evening. The Vicar reminded the congregation that he had been a Territorial Chaplain for three years and that at any time since the war broke out he had been liable to be called up. At the outbreak of hostilities he offered his services completely to the War Office. He had now been informed that it was the wish of
the military authorities that he should go out to Chaplain to his own regiment, the 6th West Yorkshire, and he had replied that he would loyally answer to the call. He had already passed the necessary medical examination. One of the reasons why he was pleased to go to the work was because of the many letters he had received from members of the regiment expressing the wish that he as their chaplain should be with them. Support During the Vicar’s absence the parish will be under the care of the Rev H A Moreton (curate). On Sunday Mr Whincup heartily commended Mr Moreton to the parishioners and asked them to support him by all the means in their power.
Men from the district who are serving in France with the 6th West Yorkshire Regiment will welcome the arrival of the Rev R Whincup, vicar of Windhill, as their chaplain. He has been one of the chaplains of the regiment for three years and was as popular with the military men as he is in his own parish, where he has earned the reputation of being one of the hardest working parsons who ever donned the cloth. The rev. gentleman, now in khaki, left Bradford Exchange Station at 8.40 a.m. on Wednesday. He had kept the time of his departure a secret and only two or three prominent churchmen, together with his clerical colleagues at Windhill, were at the station to see him off. Although sorry to leave his parish, he regards it as a great honour to have been given the privilege of doing “his bit” by ministering to our lads in the fighting line. Asked, as he boarded the train, if he had any message to send to those whom he had left behind, Mr Whincup replied, “Yes; and it is ‘God bless Windhill”.’
“The rev. gentleman, now in khaki, left Bradford Exchange Station at 8.40 a.m. on Wednesday. He had kept the time  of his departure a secret and only two or three prominent churchmen, together with his clerical colleagues at Windhill, were at the station to see him off.”
Rev Whincup sets off to the Front
On 30 April 1914, the Shipley Times & Express ran a story on what was becoming a regular theme, the need to enlist more men to fight for the country. Rev Whincup spoke about this and his own position In the course of a short talk to the Windhill Vestry meeting, the vicar, Rev R Whincup, touched on the war. He said that 230 men from Windhill had signed
up to fight and eight had already given their lives for their country. ‘There are perhaps more who ought to go but the matter rests with themselves whether they respond to the call or not,’ he said. He admitted that ‘every man cannot, of course, be spared. The making of munitions and khaki is an important factor at the present time.’
And in regard to the position of the clergy during the war he agreed with the Archbishop of Canterbury that it was the duty of the clergy to stay at home and attend to the work of the church. ‘There are moral problems before the country and if the ranks of the clergy are depleted it might be a serious matter in many respects.’