Friday 2 June 1916
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An outbreak of diphtheria in Saltaire brought a stern editorial criticising comments made at an Education Committee meeting which were ‘calculated to give the impression that a serious state of things existed in the town.’ The council had issued a statement the following day trying to allay fears and the editorial regretted the committee’s action ‘for it is well known that the public are easily alarmed in matters of this description. ‘The truth is that diphtheria has to some extent been prevalent during the past twelve months, mainly in the Windhill district, but it has never assumed anything in the nature of an epidemic. The outbreak at Saltaire is not an epidemic either.’ Nothing alarming The article went on to explain that doctors reported cases of infectious diseases more than in the past and assured readers, ‘there is nothing particularly alarming in the outbreak in Saltaire and everything is being done to prevent the spread of the infection. ‘The sanitary condition of the district is excellent and the fact that it is at present free from scarlet fever is a strong testimony to its healthfulness. ‘These periodic outbreaks of diphtheria do occur and it takes time to stamp them out. But parents may rest assured that everything possible is being done to relieve them of any anxiety they may be experiencing.’
No need to panic over diphtheria
It was something of a surprise to the Shipley District Council to be informed by the Midland Railway Co that it was necessary to reconstruct the bridge over the railway in Valley Road. It is not a great many years since the company widened the structure and so far as the public could judge it seemed to be in satisfactory condition. The engineers, however, have discovered some weakness and the management of the company have approved a scheme for a new bridge. An enormous amount of traffic passes over the bridge – some of it of a very heavy character – and the company with their usual thoroughness, intend to erect a structure which the public can use with perfect safety.
New bridge needed over railway in Valley Road
The avenue of stately elms, known as Esholt Walks, is now seen at its best. The majestic old trees are clothed in all the loveliness of their new foliage and an inner line of saplings, planted some few years ago, lend a pleasing contrast to the view. A large number of additional new seats have recently been erected and are an improvement on the old ones, inasmuch as they are built of sawn wood, which ease the back better than the rustic pattern. Plumage Students of ornithology – the science of birds – will surely find much of interest in the locality, for the uninitiated see many birds of such uncommon size and plumage as to puzzle him. A correspondent tells us that in the month of May he saw in the Esholt valley a hawk, a cuckoo, many peewits and seagulls, some wild ducks, blackbirds and thrushes galore. The still unpurified river remains the great drawback – otherwise one fails to conceive of anything more exquisite than the stretch of the Aire valley in the neighbourhood of Esholt and Apperley Bridge.
Perfect time to visit Esholt Walks
An inquest at Shipley Fire Station returned a verdict of accidental drowning after hearing of the death of nine-year-old Harry Varley of 7 Atkinson Street, Shipley. The boy’s mother, Mrs Mary Varley, told the jury that her son had left home at half-past eight on Thursday evening to go and play on some waste land near the Leeds and Liverpool Canal in Wharfe Street, immediately behind the Theatre de Luxe. Teapot She started to get anxious when he didn’t return and a search was made at 10.30 p.m but the boy couldn’t be found. The next morning John Holmes, a boatman who lived in Wharfe Street,
discovered that his boat, which had been tied up the night before, was adrift. He also found a teapot with a string attached on the canal bank nearby. He immediately took a boat hook and dragged the canal and found Harry’s body in a few minutes. It was his view that the boy, who had never learned to swim, had been trying to catch fish in the teapot but when he had loosened the boat and pushed it off he lost his balance and fell into the water.
He was the second young boy to drown in the canal in recent weeks and one jury member commented that he was surprised there weren’t even more. ‘It is no unusual thing on a Saturday afternoon to see about twenty children playing on the canal,’ he said. Frogs and fishes Another reported he had heard that teachers were asking pupils to take frogs and fishes into school. Inspector Beaton said he had no evidence this had happened in this case but that teachers should not encourage children to play on the canal banks because it was dangerous and if he heard of any such encouragement he would launch an investigation.
“It is no unusual thing on a Saturday afternoon to see about twenty children playing on the canal.”
Harry drowned while fishing with a teapot
Foxes have again been busy in the Idle district. On Wednesday morning about 3 a.m. Mr Lougee’s poultry yards were visited by Mr Reynard or Mrs Vixen and several fowls are missing We understand there is a fox’s lair at Moor End but whether Wednesday’s visitor was from there or not is not known. Fowl-keepers will have to see that their fowls are fastened up at night otherwise Mr Reynard may be paying them a nocturnal visit in search of a tasty meal for the young cubs.
FIFTY-THIRD YEAR GREAT WEST RIDING GALA PEEL PARK, BRADFORD WHIT-MONDAY AND TUESDAY JUNE 12th and 13th For the Benefit of the Hospital Fund SPECIAL PROGRAMME OF AMUSEMENTS HICKEY’S COMEDY CIRCUS See the REVOLVING TABLE and try the RIDEABLE MULE RED, WHITE AND BLUE TRIO MDLLE OLEOS ZAFAREE ERMAKOV, the Russian Cossack assisted by OLGA ERMAKOV in Warlike Sports GREAT COMIC INTERLUDES FINISH OF THE GREAT WALK MILITARY SPORTS FOUR BANDS, DANCING, FIREWORKS Gates open at Two Admission - 6d. Children 3d. War Tax 1d Members of His Majesty’s forces in uniform, Half Price
The stewards of Idle recreation ground discovered the bowling green pitted with marks from horse’s hooves. ‘In one part there was a run of something like twenty yards and in various other parts prints were visible, some of them to a depth of between one and two inches.’ There was concern that the greens would not be as good after repair because the ‘result being to make the woods jump.’ It seems that ‘a horse had wandered into Railway Lane from an adjacent paddock and finding the recreation gate open, took the opportunity to walk round. The gates, we are informed, are opened by a police constable each morning very early. ‘The grass was much longer in the other parts of the enclosure and the equine intruder appears to have been attracted by the levelness and the fine texture of the growth on the green.’
Horse leaves its mark
Apperley Bridge garden party
The above is a group at the garden party given at Ferncliffe, Apperley Bridge, the residence of Alderman and Mrs Fred Foster, on Saturday, in support of the scheme for providing YMCA huts for the troops in Yorkshire. The group comprises the Lord Mayor and the Lady Mayoress of Bradford, Mr and Mrs Thomas Howarth, who are in the centre; Alderman and Mrs Foster, who are immediately behind the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress; Mr and Mrs George Garnett, Thackley; Mrs W Garnett; Mr J C Garnett; Mr F H Bentham; the Rev W H Power, vicar of Greengates; Miss Power; Mr Alfred Jowett, Mr and Mrs John Whitehead; Miss Whitehead; Miss Sketlington; Miss Dracup; Miss Pilley; Cllr Cliffort Walton, Calverley; and Mr Albert Hirst.
Seldom a week passed without reference to conscientious objectors, mostly negative in its tone. This week saw the report of a motion proposed by Mr J Hudson at a meeting of the Shipley Trades Council. He wanted the Council to meet with local clergymen to try and secure better treatment for COs who had already been called up. But the report said: ‘The motion failed to secure a majority.’ Bishop Columnist ‘Wanderer’ also touched on the subject, writing: ‘In these days when we hear so much one way and another of conscience, the following story of Archbishop Whateley is useful to remember. ‘When it was alleged in defence of a man who had been guilty of a questionable action that he had but followed his conscience, the Archbishop answered, “Yes, as a man in a gig follows his horse by driving it before him”.’
Mr Reynard and Mrs Vixen on the prowl
Trades Council show little sympathy for Conscientious Objectors
The writer covering the delights of the local cinemas had no doubt that film would soon be overtaking old fashioned books in people’s affections. ‘The renowned author-journalist, Mr Arnold Bennett,’ he wrote, ‘has written nothing better than that famous satirical comedy “The Great Adventure” and during the beginning of this week, Shipley people had a splendid opportunity of seeing Arnold Bennett’s masterpiece on the screen at the popular Pavilion De Luxe. ‘A picture representation such as this brings more forcefully to the mind the impressions and ideas of the author than the mere perusal of the printed page. Fighting film serial ‘A Keystone styled ‘The Cannon Ball’ was included in the programme.’ Looking ahead, he added: ‘For the week end, the remarkable film “The Key to Yesterday” has been obtained. The fighting film serial “Greed” which has been so successful, is being continued. There is the usual matinee on Saturday afternoon at 2.30. ‘During the early part of next week a romantic tale of the turf, entitled “Blue Grass,” will be shown. It is a true sporting picture and one that will appeal to all sections of the public. The comedy picture is called “A Rascal’s Wolfish Way,” one of the boisterous Keyston Screamers.’
Film has more impact than books